Social Justice for All?

Four Week Unit

Course: English Language Arts, 9th grade

Unit: Social Justice for All?

Standards:

NCTE Standards

NCTE Standard 1: Students read a wide range of print and non-print texts to build an understanding of texts, of themselves, and of the cultures of the United States and the world; to acquire new information; to respond to the needs and demands of society and the workplace; and for personal fulfillment. Among these texts are fiction and nonfiction, classic and contemporary works.

NCTE Standard 3: Students apply a wide range of strategies to comprehend, interpret, evaluate, and appreciate texts. They draw on their prior experience, their interactions with other readers and writers, their knowledge of word meaning and of other texts, their word identification strategies, and their understanding of textual features (e.g., sound-letter correspondence, sentence structure, context, graphics).

NCTE Standard 5: Students employ a wide range of strategies as they write and use different writing process elements appropriately to communicate with different audiences for a variety of purposes.

NCTE Standard 6: Students apply knowledge of language structure, language conventions (e.g., spelling and punctuation), media techniques, figurative language, and genre to create, critique, and discuss print and non-print texts.

Common Core State Standards

CCSS 1.2: Use writing, speaking, and visual expression for personal understanding and growth.

CCSS 1.5: Produce a variety of written, spoken, multigenre, and multimedia works, making conscious choices about language, form, style, and/or visual representation for each work.

CCSS 2.2: Use a variety of reading, listening, and viewing strategies to construct meaning beyond the literal level.

CCSS 3.2: Read and respond to classic and contemporary fiction, literary nonfiction, and expository text, from a variety of literary genres representing many time periods and authors.

CCSS 3.4: Examine mass media, film, series fiction, and other texts from popular culture.

Texts:

Choice novels

  • The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas
  • Esperanza Rising by Pam Munos Ryan
  • Diary of a Part Time Indian by Sherman Alexie
  • The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton
  • Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston

Required Poetry

  • Brown Girl Dreaming by Jacqueline Woodson
  • “Caged Bird” by Maya Angelou
  • “Hanging Fire” by Audre Lorde
  • “Harlem” by Langston Hughes
  • “Self Evident” by Ani DiFranco

Critical Viewing

  • A Raisin in the Sun, film adaptations 1961 & 2008
  • Applicable news reports

Supplemental Texts, Teacher-Led Reading

  • “Letter from a Birmingham Jail” – Letter by Martin Luther King Jr.
  • “I Have a Dream” – Speech by Martin Luther King Jr.
  • Selections of Native American speeches – “Speech to John Smith, 1609,” “Speech to Governor La Barre of New France, 1684,” “Negotiations for the Casco Bay Treaty, 1727,” “Petition to the Massachusetts General Court, 1752”
  • “Advertisements from the Pennsylvania Gazette, 1742-1748” that show abuse of women and gender inequality in the 18th
  • “‘Women’s Liberation’ Aims to Free Men, Too,” 1970
  • “A Proclamation: To the Great White Father and All His People” 1969 from the American Indian Movement
  • “Statement of Phil Wilson, Director of Public Policy, AIDS Project, Los Angeles,” 1994; “Statement of Letitia Gomez, Executive Director, Latino/a Lesbian and Gay Organization,” 1994
  • “Statement of Conscience” 2003, NION regarding the U.S. declaring war in Iraq
  • The ACLU’s “Freedom Under Fire: Dissent in Post-9/11 America, May 2003”

Critical Listening– Protest Music

  • Phil Ochs, “I Ain’t Marching Anymore” 1965
  • Malvina Reynolds, “Little Boxes” 1962
  • Bob Dylan, “It’s Alright Ma (I’m Only Bleeding),” 1965
  • Mos Def, “New World Water”
  • Immortal Technique, “The 4th Branch”
  • Steve Earle, “Rich Man’s War”

Form of Intertextual Study: Thematic

What do we know so far:

  • Every person has different experiences and points of view
  • Writing can be used to give voice to people who cannot speak out, however language can be used to oppress people as well
  • All texts, even news reporting, should be viewed critically for intention and bias

Purpose:

  • To think critically about texts we read, even textbooks, news reports and advertisements constructs a narrative of how people live, think, and experience life.
  • To analyze how writers/speakers use language in texts to represent themselves and others in either a positive or negative way.
  • To identify and challenge language that perpetuates stereotypes, bias, and prejudice in the texts of American society.

Essential Questions:

  • Do all Americans have equal opportunity and justice?
  • What can individuals do to affect change?
  • What does it mean to be prejudiced and biased?
  • What is the experience of someone who is oppressed?

Unit Questions:

  • What is privilege?
  • What is social justice?
  • What is perspective?
  • What is a stereotype?
  • What is freedom?
  • What are civil liberties?
  • What are human rights?

Formative Assessment:

  • Participation in a Socratic seminar about the essential questions.
  • Participation in Book Clubs.
  • Eight (8) journal entries from which the autobiography paper and poems will be written.
  • Completion of quick writes & tool box activities.

Summative Assessment:

  • A personal “autobiography” paper in which the student discusses social justice as it applies to their personal experiences.
  • Compose an original “dissent” poem or song.

Performance Assessment:

  • Perform/present original poem or song for peers.

 

Learning Activities

  • Small group discussion in the forms of literature circles.
  • Large group discussion in the form of Socratic seminar.
  • Small group discussion of digital arguments found online (infographics, “memes,” campaign ads, etc.).
  • Journal responses in which students will analyze current news reports.
  • Vocabulary toolbox collage – students work in groups to define terms unique to the discussion of social issues (including, oppression, justice, ethnicity, race, class, prejudice, bias, opportunity, etc.) and gather images, art, and words that represent them to form a collage.
  • Teacher modeling of revision and peer-review in writing workshops.
  • Teacher presented historical background and sharing of historical dissent speeches.
  • Class read aloud of Brown Girl Dreaming by Jacqueline Woodson.

Unit Rationale:

            As a result of the wide use of social media, Americans adolescents to middle-age are bombarded with digital arguments from a variety of sources that may or may not be credible and non-bias. Social media arguments in the forms of infographics, “memes,” and news reports are frequently used to support misconceptions about the social realities of American society. Students need the tools to be critical readers, not merely consumers of information. This unit presents students with tools for discussion, particularly around the central topic of social justice. High school students are not excluded from discussions about gun violence, race, immigration and privilege. Those same students may also experience discrimination in their own lives on the basis of their race, ethnicity, gender, or sexual orientation. Other students are privileged and have little tangible experience with these issues. By using a wide range of expository texts, poetry, music, and media reports, this unit achieves several goals: to validate the experiences of each student, to challenge misconceptions about privilege and equality, to identify and challenge bias, and promote internal reflection.

The class activities follow a routine of responding to texts that are presented by the teacher, assigned as a required class read, or choice texts for book clubs. Students respond first on their own with a journal response or quick write and then with their peers in a Think-Pair-Share or in their Book Clubs. Each class ends by returning to the essential and unit questions that guide the unit through group discussion. All of the texts chosen for this unit are examples of the experiences of someone who experiences oppression and the responses of individuals who chose to speak out against injustice. For assessment the students will write a personal autobiography that describes who they are as a person, the struggles that they experience, and the privilege they have or do not have in their life. In addition, students will also compose their own protest music or poetry that responds to a current social issue that is important to them.

Unit Overview

Mon Tues Wed Thurs Fri
1 “Harlem” by Langston Hughes

 

Toolbox Session #1

Martin Luther King Jr. writing/speech

 

Buzz Feed Privilege Walk Activity

 

Journal Response 1

A Raisin in the Sun, film (1961)

 

News Report Share – Police Violence & African Americans

Brown Girl Dreaming by Jacqueline Woodson

 

Journal Response 2

Protest Music Day 1

 

2 “Hanging Fire” by Audre Lorde Toolbox Session #2

 

Selections of Native American speeches;

American Indian Movement (1969)

 

Journal Response 3

A Raisin in the Sun, film (1961)

 

News Report Share – Immigration/Border & Caravan

Brown Girl Dreaming by Jacqueline Woodson

Journal Response 4

 

Literature Circles 1

Writing Workshop

 

Personal Autobiography Draft Due

3 “Caged Bird” by Maya Angelou

Toolbox Session #3 – Collage activity

 

Literature Circles 2

The Feminist Movement, Gender Relations, AIDs, LBGTQ+ Movement

 

Journal Response 5

A Raisin in the Sun, film (1961)

 

Meme & Campaign Ad Share

 

Personal Autobiography Due

 

Brown Girl Dreaming by Jacqueline Woodson

 

Journal Response 6

 

Literature Circles 3

Writing Workshop

 

Original Dissent Poem/Song Draft Due

 

Literature Circles 4

4 “Self Evident” by Ani DiFranco

 

Toolbox Session #4

 

Literature Circles 5

 Dissent against Iraq War

 

Journal Response 7

 

Literature Circles 6

Brown Girl Dreaming by Jacqueline Woodson

 

News Report Critical Viewing

 

Protest Music Day 2

 

Journal Response 8

 

 

Writing Workshop

 

Original Dissent Poem/Song Due + Performance

 

Day Date/Class
1
Essential Question(s)
Do all Americans have equal opportunity and justice?
Unit Question(s)
What is freedom?

What are civil liberties?

What are human rights?

Time Activity Material Standards
5 Teacher “Harlem” by Langston Hughes

 

Historical Context share: Bio of Hughes & Harlem Renaissance

NCTE 1, CCSS 3.2
10 Silent Reading Book Club Choice Text NCTE 3, CCSS 3.2
5 Quick Write Toolbox Session #1 : Students collect images from online, make associations, and connect to their own experiences to define vocab words, such as, social justice, microaggression, prejudice, privilege, race, ethnicity, oppression NCTE 5, CCSS 1.5
10 Think-Pair-Share Question: Do all Americans have equal opportunity and justice? Why or why not? NCTE 3, 6
10 Book Club Discussion: In what time period does your book take place? What are some similarities between that setting and modern day? NCTE 5, CCSS 1.2
10 Class Discussion What is freedom?

What are civil liberties?

What are human rights?

NCTE 3, 6
Day Date/Class
2
Essential Question(s)
Do all Americans have equal opportunity and justice?
Unit Question(s)
What is privilege?

What is freedom?

What are civil liberties?

What are human rights?

Time Activity Material Standards
5 Teacher “Letter from a Birmingham Jail” – Letter by Martin Luther King Jr.

“I Have a Dream” – Speech by Martin Luther King Jr.

Historical Context share: Civil Rights Movement, segregation, Reconstruction, post-slavery race relations, Jim Crow

NCTE 3, CCSS 3.2
10 Silent Reading Book Club Choice Text NCTE 3, CCSS 3.2
5 Quick Write Journal Response #1 – When have I witnessed injustice? NCTE 5, CCSS 1.2
15 Class Interaction BuzzFeed Privilege Walk Activity and discussion
15 Book Club Discussion: Is there one character or group in the text that is oppressed? What is their experience like? Who in the book is privileged? NCTE 5, CCSS 1.2
10 Class Discussion What is freedom?

What are civil liberties?

What are human rights?

NCTE 3, 6
Day Date/Class
3
Essential Question(s)
Do all Americans have equal opportunity and justice?

What is the experience of someone who is oppressed?

Unit Question(s)
What is freedom?

What are civil liberties?

What are human rights?

Time Activity Material Standards
5 Teacher News Report Share: Reports of the shooting of African Americans, Nov. 2018 shooting of Emantic Bradford, New York Times article; CNN reporting & police narrative

Historical Context share: Bill of Rights, 13th & 14th Amendments, Black Lives Matter Movement

NCTE 1, CCSS 3.4
30 Critical Viewing A Raisin in the Sun (1961)

Comprehension Strategy – Visual Organizer (divide paper into sections, each time a new character is introduced write down the name, adjectives to describe that character’s personality and determine a few things that the character wants from life) 

NCTE 1, 2, CCSS 3.2
5 Quick Write Respond: What shocked you? What did not surprise you? Do you see any similarities between when the movie takes place and now? Any differences? NCTE 5, CCSS 1.2
10 Class Discussion What is freedom?

What are civil liberties?

What are human rights?

NCTE 3, 6
Day Date/Class
4
Essential Question(s)
What is the experience of someone who is oppressed
Unit Question(s)
What is freedom?

What are civil liberties?

What are human rights?

Time Activity Material Standards
15 Class read Brown Girl Dreaming by Jacqueline Woodson

 

Historical Context share: Diaspora in African American history

NCTE 3, CCSS 3.2
10 Silent Reading Book Club Choice Text NCTE 3, CCSS 3.2
15 Think-Pair-Share Journal Response #2 – Where do I see injustice in my community? NCTE 5, CCSS 1.2
10 Writing Workshop Using the first two journal responses, class quick-writes, etc. write an outline for the Personal Autobiography Paper about how you either experience or do not experience injustice.
10 Class Discussion What is freedom?

What are civil liberties?

What are human rights?

NCTE 3, 6

 

Day Date/Class
5
Essential Question(s)
Do all Americans have equal opportunity and justice?

What can individuals do to affect change?

Unit Question(s)
What is privilege?

What is social justice?

What is perspective?

What is a stereotype?

Time Activity Material Standards
5 Critical Listening Protest Music Day 1: Phil Ochs, “I Ain’t Marching Anymore” 1965

Immortal Technique, “The 4th Branch”

Historical Context share: Hip hop genre,  police brutality

NCTE 1, 2, CCSS 3.2, 3.4
10 Silent Reading Book Club Choice Text NCTE 3, CCSS 3.2
5 Quick Write Students respond to the critical listening by writing a new verse about their lives/an issue they care about. NCTE 5, CCSS 1.2
10 Think-Pair-Share Question: Should citizens be complacent or speak out? NCTE 5, CCSS 1.2
10 Book Club Discussion: At this point have any characters used a form of language to fight back against an oppressor? NCTE 5, CCSS 1.2
10 Class Discussion What is privilege?

What is social justice?

What is perspective?

What is a stereotype?

NCTE 3, 6

 

Day Date/Class
6
Essential Question(s)
Do all Americans have equal opportunity and justice?
Unit Question(s)
What is privilege?

What is social justice?

What is perspective?

What is a stereotype?

Time Activity Material Standards
5 Teacher “Hanging Fire” by Audre Lorde NCTE 3, CCSS 3.2
10 Silent Reading Book Club Choice Text NCTE 3, CCSS 3.2
5 Quick Write Toolbox Session #2: colonialism, discourse, power NCTE 5, CCSS 1.2
10 Think-Pair-Share Question: Do all Americans have equal opportunity and justice? (Return to similar discussion from day 1 – has anything about your answer changed after our first week of study? NCTE 5, CCSS 1.2
10 Book Club Discussion: What characters possess power in the book? Do they have concrete tools at their disposal for enforcing that power? NCTE 5, CCSS 1.2
10 Class Discussion What is freedom?

What are civil liberties?

What are human rights?

NCTE 3, 6
Day Date/Class
7
Essential Question(s)
Do all Americans have equal opportunity and justice?
Unit Question(s)
What is freedom?

What are civil liberties?

What are human rights?

Time Activity Material Standards
5 Teacher Selections of Native American speeches – “Speech to John Smith, 1609,” “Speech to Governor La Barre of New France, 1684,” “Negotiations for the Casco Bay Treaty, 1727,” “Petition to the Massachusetts General Court, 1752” & “A Proclamation: To the Great White Father and All His People” 1969 from the American Indian Movement

 

Historical Context share: Native American genocide, reservation conditions, colonization and evangelization of native people, discourse of power regarding of native people (“Indian,” “savage”)

NCTE 3, CCSS 3.2
10 Silent Reading Book Club Choice Text NCTE 3, CCSS 3.2
5 Quick Write Journal Response #3: What is your home like? What parts of it are important to you? NCTE 5, CCSS 1.2
10 Think-Pair-Share Question: Whose land is America? Can we own land? Can conquering/invading land be justified? NCTE 5, CCSS 1.2
10 Book Club Discussion: Are there spaces (pieces of land, cities, social circles) in the text that exclude certain people? Why and how does that affect the oppressed characters? NCTE 5, CCSS 1.2
10 Class Discussion What is freedom?

What are civil liberties?

What are human rights?

NCTE 3, 6
Day Date/Class
8
Essential Question(s)
Do all Americans have equal opportunity and justice?
Unit Question(s)
What is perspective?

What is a stereotype?

Time Activity Material Standards
5 Teacher News Report Share – immigration/border patrolling, caravan at US border; New York Times coverage about migrant caravan

 

Historical Context share: asylum, human rights, the UN on refugees, Syrian refugees

NCTE 1, 2, CCSS 3.2, 3.4
30 Critical Viewing A Raisin in the Sun,

Comprehension strategy: List ways characters are prejudice in the film.

NCTE 1, 2, CCSS 3.2, 2.2
5 Quick Write Question: Are stereotypes true? Are they accurate assumptions/descriptions of an individual’s behavior? Should we be welcoming of people unlike ourselves? What if they are in need of help? NCTE 5, CCSS 1.2
10 Class Discussion What is perspective?

What is a stereotype?

NCTE 3, 6
Day Date/Class
9
Essential Question(s)
Do all Americans have equal opportunity and justice?
Unit Question(s)
What is freedom?

What are civil liberties?

What are human rights?

Time Activity Material Standards
15 Class read Brown Girl Dreaming by Jacqueline Woodson

 

NCTE 3, CCSS 3.2
10 Silent Reading Book Club Choice Text NCTE 3, CCSS 3.2
15 Think-Pair-Share Journal Response 4 – Should humans help other humans in need, regardless of the circumstances? NCTE 5, CCSS 1.2
10 Book Club Literature Circles Begin NCTE 5, CCSS 1.2
10 Class Discussion What is freedom?

What are civil liberties?

What are human rights?

 

NCTE 3, 6

Day Date/Class
10
Essential Question(s)
Do all Americans have equal opportunity and justice?
Unit Question(s)
What is freedom?

What are civil liberties?

What are human rights?

Time Activity Material Standards
5 Teacher Model how to revise a sentence, example on document cam for class.

Personal Autobiography Draft Due

10 Silent Reading Book Club Choice Text NCTE 3, CCSS 3.2
5 Quick Write Write poem/response besides “Hanging Fire” by Audre Lorde. NCTE 5, CCSS 1.2
10 Peer Review In book club groups, read papers aloud for students. Students respond with sandwich complements (complement, critique, complement).
10 Class Discussion What is freedom?

What are civil liberties?

What are human rights?

NCTE 3, 6
Day Date/Class
11
Essential Question(s)
Do all Americans have equal opportunity and justice?
Unit Question(s)
What is freedom?

What are civil liberties?

What are human rights?

Time Activity Material Standards
5 Teacher “Caged Bird” by Maya Angelou
10 Silent Reading Book Club Choice Text NCTE 3, CCSS 3.2
5 Quick Write Toolbox Session #3: gender, sexuality, power, glass ceiling, equality.
10 Think-Pair-Share Question: Do all Americans have equal opportunity and justice? NCTE 5, CCSS 1.2
10 Book Club Literature Circles NCTE 5, CCSS 1.2
10 Class Discussion What is freedom?

What are civil liberties?

What are human rights?

NCTE 3, 6
Day Date/Class
12
Essential Question(s)
Do all Americans have equal opportunity and justice?
Unit Question(s)
What is freedom?

What are civil liberties?

What are human rights?

Time Activity Material Standards
5 Teacher Pennsylvania Gazette, 1742-1748”;

“‘Women’s Liberation’ Aims to Free Men, Too,” (1970); “Statement of Phil Wilson, Director of Public Policy, AIDS Project, Los Angeles,” 1994; “Statement of Letitia Gomez, Executive Director, Latino/a Lesbian and Gay Organization,” 1994

 

Historical Context share: gender politics, stereotypes, LBTQ+ movement, the feminist movement

NCTE 3, CCSS 3.2
10 Silent Reading Book Club Choice Text NCTE 3, CCSS 3.2
5 Quick Write Journal Response #5 – How do you see yourself? How does society see you? Do you meet the expectations society places on you because of your gender? NCTE 5, CCSS 1.2
10 Think-Pair-Share Question: What are stereotypical descriptions of men and women? NCTE 5, CCSS 1.2
10 Book Club Question: Are any of the characters oppressed because of their gender or sexuality? Why or why not? NCTE 5, CCSS 1.2
10 Class Discussion What is freedom?

What are civil liberties?

What are human rights?

NCTE 3, 6

 

Day Date/Class
13
Essential Question(s)
Do all Americans have equal opportunity and justice?
Unit Question(s)
What is freedom?

What are civil liberties?

What are human rights?

Time Activity Material Standards
5 Teacher Campaign Ad Share: What is the hidden message?

ACLU & LBGTQ+ Rights talk about resources

NCTE 3, CCSS 3.2
30 Critical Viewing A Raisin in the Sun (1961)

Students find one connection between a current event and issues in the film.

NCTE 1, 2, CCSS 3.2, 2.2
5 Quick Write Question: Have we changed? NCTE 5, CCSS 1.2
10 Class Discussion What is freedom?

What are civil liberties?

What are human rights?

NCTE 3, 6

 

Day Date/Class
14
Essential Question(s)
Do all Americans have equal opportunity and justice?
Unit Question(s)
What is freedom?

What are civil liberties?

What are human rights?

Time Activity Material Standards
15 Class read Brown Girl Dreaming by Jacqueline Woodson

 

NCTE 3, CCSS 3.2
10 Silent Reading Book Club Choice Text NCTE 3, CCSS 3.2
15 Think-Pair-Share Journal Response #6 – Does language matter? Write about a time words hurt you. NCTE 5, CCSS 1.2
10 Book Club Literature Circles NCTE 5, CCSS 1.2
10 Class Discussion What is freedom?

What are civil liberties?

What are human rights?

NCTE 3, 6

 

Day Date/Class
15
Essential Question(s)
Do all Americans have equal opportunity and justice?
Unit Question(s)
What is freedom?

What are civil liberties?

What are human rights?

Time Activity Material Standards
5 Teacher Teacher models revision of poem/song, example on document camera.

 

Original Dissent Poem/Song Draft Due

10 Silent Reading Book Club Choice Text/ Short conferences with teacher NCTE 3, CCSS 3.2
15 Peer review Read poem/song aloud in book club groups. Students respond with sandwich complements. NCTE 5, CCSS 1.2
10 Book Club Literature Circles NCTE 5, CCSS 1.2
10 Class Discussion What is freedom?

What are civil liberties?

What are human rights?

NCTE 3, 6
Day Date/Class
16
Essential Question(s)
Do all Americans have equal opportunity and justice?
Unit Question(s)
What is freedom?

What are civil liberties?

What are human rights?

Time Activity Material Standards
5 Teacher/Critical Listening “Self Evident” by Ani DiFranco

 

Historical Context share: The Declaration of Independence, US declares war in Iraq in 2003; 9/11, 2001 Terrorist Attack; “war on terror”; anti-Muslim sentiment

NCTE 3, CCSS 3.2
10 Silent Reading Book Club Choice Text NCTE 3, CCSS 3.2
5 Quick Write Toolbox Session #4: peace, nonviolence, war, terrorism NCTE 5, CCSS 1.2
10 Think-Pair-Share Question: Do all Americans have equal opportunity and justice? NCTE 5, CCSS 1.2
10 Book Club Literature circles NCTE 5, CCSS 1.2
10 Class Discussion What is freedom?

What are civil liberties?

What are human rights?

NCTE 3, 6
Day Date/Class
17
Essential Question(s)
Do all Americans have equal opportunity and justice?

What can individuals do to affect change?

Unit Question(s)
What is freedom?

What are civil liberties?

What are human rights?

Time Activity Material Standards
5 Teacher  “Statement of Conscience” 2003, NION regarding the U.S. declaring war in Iraq

The ACLU’s “Freedom Under Fire: Dissent in Post-9/11 America, May 2003”

 

NCTE 3, CCSS 3.2
10 Silent Reading Book Club Choice Text NCTE 3, CCSS 3.2
5 Quick Write Journal Response #7: Why do nations go to war? NCTE 5, CCSS 1.2
10 Think-Pair-Share Question: Is violence only overseas? What kind of violence do we have in our community? NCTE 5, CCSS 1.2
10 Book Club Literature Circles NCTE 5, CCSS 1.2
10 Class Discussion What is freedom?

What are civil liberties?

What are human rights?

NCTE 3, 6

 

Day Date/Class
18
Essential Question(s)
Do all Americans have equal opportunity and justice?
Unit Question(s)
What is freedom?

What are civil liberties?

What are human rights?

Time Activity Material Standards
10 Teacher News Report Critical Viewing : Response to white rapist; Smearing of black preacher’s death by mention of possible marijuana in apartment

 

Question: How do news reports misrepresent events? How do they show bias? How does white privilege and male privilege contribute to justice? How do racial stereotypes relate to justice?

NCTE 1, 2, CCSS 3.2
20 Critical Viewing A Raisin in the Sun (1961) : Plot map, students draw a visual representation of the plot in the movie.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NCTE 1, 2, CCSS 3.2, 2.2
5 Quick Write Question: What is one important aspect of the film? Why should people watch or not watch the film? NCTE 5, CCSS 1.2
10 Class Discussion What is freedom?

What are civil liberties?

What are human rights?

NCTE 3, 6
Day Date/Class
19
Essential Question(s)
Do all Americans have equal opportunity and justice?
Unit Question(s)
What is freedom?

What are civil liberties?

What are human rights?

Time Activity Material Standards
15 Critical Listening Protest Music Day 2: Steve Earle, “Rich Man’s War”

Malvina Reynolds, “Little Boxes” 1962

Bob Dylan, “It’s Alright Ma (I’m Only Bleeding),” 1965

 

Historical Context share: Vietnam War, Vietnam War Protests, history of nonviolent movements

 

NCTE 1, 2, CCSS 3.2
10 Silent Reading Book Club Choice Text
15 Think-Pair-Share Journal Response #8 – Can war be justified? Is peace really attainable? Why or why not? NCTE 5, CCSS 1.2
10 Book Club Discussion: What forms of violence are seen in the text? What characters use them and why? NCTE 5, CCSS 1.2
10 Class Discussion What is freedom?

What are civil liberties?

What are human rights?

NCTE 3, 6

 

Day Date/Class
20
Essential Question(s)
Do all Americans have equal opportunity and justice?
Unit Question(s)
What is freedom?

What are civil liberties?

What are human rights?

Time Activity Material Standards
5 Book Talk Brief descriptions of other social justice YA texts
35 Performances Dissent Poems Final Drafts Due, Class Readings/Performances NCTE 3, 6
10 Book Club Final thoughts NCTE 5, CCSS 1.2

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